Truro

Photo Credit: Ben Nugent

Truro

Truro has fewer residents now than it did in 1840, when Pamet Harbor was a whaling and shipbuilding port, which is possibly one of the best reasons to go there. Beyond a post office, a seasonal gourmet food market and a single blinking light, there is hardly a town to Truro, Massachusetts.  And beyond beautiful homes built into the hills and a narrow strip of tiny cottages and motels, there is little real commercial development here - it is more a sleepy and rural world of moors, hills, valleys and rivers with homes hidden amongst the trees. Back roads wind through fascinating scenery dominated by long rolling hills called “hogsbacks."

This bucolic village qualifies as the Cape’s ‘sleepiest’ community. Writers, artists, politicos and mental health types are wont to vacation and live here and American art icon Edward Hopper—who found the Cape’s light ideal for his brand of austere realism— summered in South Truro for nearly 40 years in near-total contentment. And while many visitors are drawn by this relative isolation, they can be comforted by the fact that lively Provincetown is but a short drive away.

Find more information on Truro through the Truro Chamber of Commerce.